Next Meeting – Monday, April 11

Join the next meeting of the Veterans Book Club on Monday, April 11, 5:30 -7:00 pm in the University Grill, Fireside Room.

We’ll be discussing Fire and Forget: Short Stories from the Long War, edited by Roy Scranton and Matt Gallagher, with a focus on two stories:

  • Redeployment by Phil Klay, 2014 National Book Award Winner in Fiction
  • Tips for a Smooth Transition by Siobhan Fallon (providing a perspective of an army wife)

Schurz Library – PS648.W34 F57 2013

We encourage you to bring family members.  Supervised activities for children will available. Free parking and refreshments provided.

Please RSVP to Rhonda Culbertson at rculbert@iusb.edu and mention the ages and any food allergies of children who may attend.

About Fire and Forget:

While the grand, noble causes of the past wars continue to capture our collective imaginations, the ongoing conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have been treated with greater ambivalence. Fire and Forget, a collection of short stories by authors who are also military veterans (or, in one case, a family member), captures the messiness of soldiering when the mission and endgame are unclear. Though fiction, each work reads true, filled with tension, fear, and anger. Readers are transported to desert checkpoints, ride along with vehicle convoys, and return home from combat to face an uncertain future. –Patty Wetli, Booklist

 

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Women Writing War

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Female soldier

ON MARCH 31 2014, war veteran and novelist Cara Hoffman published an op-ed in The New York Times in which she argued that war narratives — in prose, poetry, and film — have always been, and continue to be, dominated by male voices.  The stories of women at war, on the other hand, she said are “nearly absent from our culture.”

Shortly thereafter, Kayla Williams — a former sergeant and Arabic linguist in a Military Intelligence company of the 101st Airborne Division, and author of two memoirs about her experiences as a servicewoman at home and abroad — published an eloquent dissent to Hoffman’s piece on her personal blog.  She expanded on her post in this Los Angeles Review of Books article.

Do you agree with Cara or Kayla?