Feb 8th at 5:30 — Eleventh Month, Eleventh Day, Eleventh Hour: Armistice Day, 1918 World War I and Its Violent Climax

An eye-opening study of the final hours of a war that threatened never to end.

Kirkus Review

Book club meeting:   Thursday, Feb 8th at 5:30 in the Fireside room off of the Grill in the IU South Bend Administration Building. 

Author Joseph E. Persico reconstructs the activities of the British and American troops on the final morning of WWI, along with the reprise of the major aspects of the war that led up to that eventful day. This book was selected to marking the 100th anniversary of the First World War.

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Need a book?  Just contact vdbloom@iusb.edu.

Please note that the IU South Bend Libraries has several films related to this topic, including: 

The Last Day of World War I by  A&E Television Networks, LLC. URL [South Bend] http://fod.infobase.com/PortalPlaylists.aspx?wID=106866&xtid=4308 

New York, N.Y. : Films Media Group, [2010], c2004. (44 minutes) The final hour and day of World War I – 11 o’clock on November 11, 1918 – were decided upon well in advance. Why, then, were more than 13,000 soldiers killed that last morning of the war? Based on Joseph E. Persico’s book 11th Month, 11th Day, 11th Hour, this A&E Special reveals how Allied leaders found outrageous excuses to send thousands of soldiers to their deaths against a defeated enemy. Why did they do it? Rare footage and photos from the conflict’s last hours form a chilling indictment of the horror and pointlessness of war.

The last day of World War One by John Hayes Fisher. URL [Bloomington, Columbus, East, IUPUI, Kokomo, Northwest, South Bend, Southeast] http://www.aspresolver.com/aspresolver.asp?WHIV;1522729 (Available on campus and off campus with authorized logon)  

London, England : British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), 2008. (50 minutes) On a windswept hill in Northern France , stands one of the great memorials to the dead from the first World War. It was a war which affected almost every family in Britain. But even after the armistice was signed on November the 11th, 1918 , the terrible reality was that soldiers continue to be killed in battle. This is the story of how the war which was meant to end all wars, finally came to a close.

 

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Anatomy of a Soldier – November 7th (note: change of date)

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There will be a change of venue for our next meeting!  On Tuesday evening at 5:30 we will be gathering in the 3rd floor conference room 301 at the IU South Bend Franklin D. Schurz Library.   

We will be discussing, Anatomy of a Soldier by Harry Parker.  This novel takes a unique conceit of being told entirely from the perspective of 45 inanimate objects that play a role in the story of a soldier seriously injured by an IED.  The novelist, Harry Parker, is a British soldier who lost both his legs in Afghanistan.  He has since completed a postgraduate degree in fine art at the Royal Drawing School in Shoreditch.  An article about the author can be found at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-fitness/body/harry-parker-losing-my-legs-in-afghanistan-was-like-losing-a-lov/

Rodger Pinto, the campus President of the Student Veterans Organization will lead our discussion.  His insights will give us a deeper understanding of a more recent conflict.